Environmental Student Action Challenge

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Thank you for your interest in the Environmental Student Action Challenge! Applications for the 2020-2021 program are now closed. Stay up-to-date on funded projects on this page!


Do you have an idea for a project that could reduce the environmental footprint of your school? Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP) could help make it happen!

The Environmental Student Action Challenge invites Alberta students from kindergarten to grade 12 to develop a school-based initiative or project that will help minimize negative human impacts to the environment.

Students are invited to submit their project ideas for a chance to win up to $1,000 that can be used to turn their proposal into a reality – and give them hands-on experience tackling an environmental issue that directly impacts them, their school or their community. The Government of Alberta will award up to $15,000 in funding annually to successful applicants to support their environmental action projects.

Successful applicants will be selected from each school level (Division 1, 2, 3, 4).

Participating teams are invited to contribute to the online learning community! Provide real-time project updates, share tips, ask questions and inspire new levels of learning – the provincial Environmental Student Action Challenge community is a great way to explore new ideas throughout the school year.

This website is continuously updated with information to help you with your application, so check back often!

Thank you for your interest in the Environmental Student Action Challenge! Applications for the 2020-2021 program are now closed. Stay up-to-date on funded projects on this page!


Do you have an idea for a project that could reduce the environmental footprint of your school? Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP) could help make it happen!

The Environmental Student Action Challenge invites Alberta students from kindergarten to grade 12 to develop a school-based initiative or project that will help minimize negative human impacts to the environment.

Students are invited to submit their project ideas for a chance to win up to $1,000 that can be used to turn their proposal into a reality – and give them hands-on experience tackling an environmental issue that directly impacts them, their school or their community. The Government of Alberta will award up to $15,000 in funding annually to successful applicants to support their environmental action projects.

Successful applicants will be selected from each school level (Division 1, 2, 3, 4).

Participating teams are invited to contribute to the online learning community! Provide real-time project updates, share tips, ask questions and inspire new levels of learning – the provincial Environmental Student Action Challenge community is a great way to explore new ideas throughout the school year.

This website is continuously updated with information to help you with your application, so check back often!

  • 2020-2021 Trailbuilders, Peace Wapiti Academy, Grande Prairie

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    High school students in Grande Prairie are rolling up their sleeves and giving back to their local community this year. They have partnered with the Wapiti Nordic Ski Centre to help maintain over 50 km of trail around their community. While completing the trial maintenance, they will learn about erosion, responsible recreation and the importance of trials in minimizing human impact on the environment.

  • 2020-2021 Tower Garden, Senator Riley Middle School, High River

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    Grade 7 students at Senator Riley Middle School want to make their gardens are efficient as possible to reduce the energy required to grow local produce. With funding from the Student Action Challenge, they will be building a tower garden and initiating a growing experiment to determine how to grow produce in the most economic and environmentally friendly way possible: planting vegetables outside in a traditional garden or planting them inside in a tower garden.

  • 2020-2021 Solar Sky, Bow Valley High, Cochrane

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    The students at Bow Valley High are taking the first step in creating a renewable-energy Solar Sky this year. They will use funding from the Student Action Challenge to create a solar station on an outbuilding in the school’s football field, reducing the carbon footprint of the school and providing a space for classes to integrate solar energy into their teaching. This as the first step in a larger sustainable energy initiative.

  • 2020-2021 Shipping Container Garden, Career and Technology Centre, Calgary

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    Students at the Career and Technology Centre are getting into the nitty-gritty of indoor gardens with their Student Action Challenge project this year. Using a shipping container, they will test the advantages and disadvantages of different types of indoor growing: from passive solar to electronically controlled conditions. Their project will test the productivity of plant growth in each garden as well as the amount of electricity required. In the end, they will have a reliable data set that outlines what type of growing situation has the smallest environmental footprint. The results of their experiment will be shared through a report for the school board recommending best practices for new indoor growing spaces.

  • 2020-2021 Roofs 4 Kids Educational Pollinator Garden, Lacombe Composite High School, Lacombe

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    Gardens galore! Students at Lacombe Composite High School are expanding their outdoor learning space by planting native herbs and medicinal seedlings, creating food and shelter for pollinators and other types of wildlife. They will be partnering with local experts, including Elders, to learn more about the environmental benefits and ecosystem services that these plants offer.

  • 2020-2021 Outdoor Classroom, Edmonton Christian Northeast School, Edmonton

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    Students are going to be taking their learning outside this year with funding from the Student Action Challenge. They will be building an outdoor classroom, which will eventually be used in some capacity by all students within the school. They plan on sharing their love of nature and inspiring environmental stewardship from other students.

  • 2020-2021 Niitsitapi Indigenous Gardens, Niitsitapi Learning Centre, Calgary

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    Students will be learning about their local environment this year by planting native seedlings and learning about their uses. Through land-based learning techniques in their Student Action Challenge project, educators will inspire environmental stewardship in students from preschool to grade 2 and the environment. With the help of Elders from their community, students will extend their learning to others by creating signage that displays their understanding and creativity.

  • 2020-2021 Living Wall, Griffith Woods School, Calgary

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    The air we breathe impacts us all. Led by the grade 8 classes, students from kindergarten to grade 9 at Griffith Woods School will find out how different plants can positively effect the air quality. They will build a living wall to help clean the air in individual classrooms. Students will measure the air quality by looking at the levels of VOCs, CO, PM, humidity and temperature, determining which plants are best at filtering pollutants from the air. Ultimately, their project will improve the air quality in their school.

  • 2020-2021 Indigenous Learning Garden, Christina Gordon Public School, Fort McMurray

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    Students and teachers at Christina Gordon Public school have noticed a lack of natural space and functioning ecosystems around their school and are determined to create a change. They will be redesigning their current garden to include native plants, increasing the biodiversity and resiliency of the ecosystem. Students will be also plant trees and shrubs that can provide shelter for wildlife and natural wind coverage for the outdoor learning spaces. Students will research, design, and post educational signs for staff and other classes to use when planning and facilitating lessons and that can educate the community about the project.

  • 2020-2021 In home Bahay Kubo, Filipino Language and Cultural School of Edmonton, Edmonton

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    At-home environmental learning is the focus of this Student Action Challenge project. Students will learn how to grow vegetables and local plants from home, since the COVID pandemic has led to the cancellation of their in-person classes. They will compare different growing conditions between students to learn how to optimize their gardens and enjoy the benefits of locally-grown produce, reducing their dependence on food grown outside of the province.